Hello and Welcome to HQCovers, a personal blog dedicated to the beauty and awesomeness of original and customized soundtrack artworks.

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“Ready Player One” by Alan Silvestri

After my extensive foray into Stranger Realms I thought I’ve had it with tribute art and spoof covers. But then Steven Spielberg’s Ready Player One came along and with it a spontaneous idea quickly formed in my head: What about a custom covers series that puts its focus on famous cover art of old (and not so old) game cartridges? An idea I immediately became hooked on and apparently I wasn’t the only one. Just have a look on RP1’s poster campaign and tell me the character set isn’t supposed to look like Sega Mega Drive covers. It’s quite obvious,…

Lost Covers, Vol. 5

This years entry of our ongoing series “Lost Covers” contains a wide array of different works. Like its predecessors, most covers in here showcase all kinds of failures and *whatcangowrongs* in cover design. But there also are little gemstones like my contract work for Gwenaël Mario Grisi, a rising Belgian composer whose overnight(!) composition Through the Clouds definitely was one of the most beautiful tracks I’ve heard in 2017. Also, Gwenaël has his own IMdb page, so he’s officially my new best friend ;) The overall amount of commissioned covers is unusually high this time. Not royality-based though, only voluntary…

“Annihilation” by Ben Salisbury, Geoff Barrow

What are the most obvious indications for a graphic designer who isn’t caring about his or her work? Blurry and fuzzy looking key art? One of the most blatant font choices out there? Or, as in the case of Annihilation, a little bit of both? Alex Garland’s latest work hasn’t had an easy start to put it mildly. After seeing the final cut, the executive producer demanded significant changes to be made, which Garland naturally refused. As a result the film got dumped to Netflix for international markets. And on top of that it received a shockingly lacklustre marketing campaign….

“Titanic (The Deluxe Edition)” by James Horner

James Cameron, known for being one, if not the most innovative and meticulous filmmaker out there, was responsible for the two highest grossing films of all time. And both prominently utilized two of the most ill-reputed typefaces of all time. It’s almost as if they did it on purpose… only to mock us typophiles. Producing a hollywood blockbuster for an allegedly production budget of $237 million dollar and then making use of “Papyrus” (a font that came free with every Windows and Mac OS computer) certainly feels somewhat ironic, there’s no denying that. Even Ryan Gosling thinks so. Ten years…

“Blade Runner 2049” by Benjamin Wallfisch, Hans Zimmer

There’s a lot to love about Blade Runner 2049, whether it’s the faithful continuation of the story from original pen Hampton Fancher or the stunningly beautiful cinematography from camera virtuoso Roger Deakins. A lot of things that deserve to be praised. Unfortunately the films marketing campaign ain’t one of them. And it’s a real shame, because, considering its poor box office performance, this film really could have used some catchy and favourable media coverage. Instead we got this trite orange & teal trivialities that look nothing like Denis Villeneuve’s dark nuanced neo-noir thriller. Not like the barren wastelands and certainly…