Lost Covers, Vol. 5

This years entry of our ongoing series “Lost Covers” contains a wide array of different works. Like its predecessors, most covers in here showcase all kinds of failures and *whatcangowrongs* in cover design. But there also are little gemstones like my contract work for Gwenaël Mario Grisi, a rising Belgian composer whose overnight(!) composition Through the Clouds definitely was one of the most beautiful tracks I’ve heard in 2017. Also, Gwenaël has his own IMdb page, so he’s officially my new best friend ;) The overall amount of commissioned covers is unusually high this time. Not royality-based though, only voluntary…

“Annihilation” by Ben Salisbury, Geoff Barrow

What are the most obvious indications for a graphic designer who isn’t caring about his or her work? Blurry and fuzzy looking key art? One of the most blatant font choices out there? Or, as in the case of Annihilation, a little bit of both? Alex Garland’s latest work hasn’t had an easy start to put it mildly. After seeing the final cut, the executive producer demanded significant changes to be made, which Garland naturally refused. As a result the film got dumped to Netflix for international markets. And on top of that it received a shockingly lacklustre marketing campaign….

Lost Covers, Vol. 4

Man, has it really been this long already? Last week HQCovers has officially turned five. By now it has learned to write its own name and has become extremely picky when it comes to dress up in the morning. Also, its extended warranty has now expired, so your chance to file a complaint is officially over ;-) I deliberately didn’t parade this anniversary, because this blog is essentially the digital extension of my own self and thus doesn’t like to stand in the spotlight. Instead I once again let the art speak for itself. I’m actually publishing Vol. 4 of this ongoing thing,…

“Ex Machina” by Ben Salisbury, Geoff Barrow

My clean-cut plan to raise visitor stats from last week’s blog post seemed to work. All facts at hand are providing a strong suspicion that at least one of my two additional visitors was redirected here through those cleverly placed hashtags. To calm the crowd I immediately follow up this week with a not-so-popular soundtrack. In fact, I’m pretty sure that the bulk of film music fans couldn’t care less about an electronic score like Ex Machina. But I do. In my book it’s an absolute benchmark when it comes to audio post-production. Alex Garland’s directorial debut is an amazing, downright incredible visual experience, but combined with the musical score from…